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20110301
20110331
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where you left off. more than ever, when we talk about the nightmare in japan, we're really talking about two nightmares. the nuclear one and everything else. again today, fire broke out at that devastated fukushima daiichi plant. and another blast of radiation escaped, for reasons still not entirely clear. the few remaining workers had to leave but they came right back in even greater numbers when the danger eased. this crisis stems from overheated fuel rods but elsewhere in japan, a cold snap, including snow, adding to the misery. searching, supporting, surviving, all of it is made more grueling because of the weather. officially the death toll topped 4,000, with more than 8,000 considered missing. this woman is scouring the rubble for her uncle. she thought she may have found his shoe. the nation heard from the emperor, reserveder pot direst of national emergencies. the emperor act key per act hes heart is broken. the volunteer utility workers who have been exposed to life-threatening radiation levels ots fukushima daiichi. their company hasn't released personal information abou
's go back to dave and pam. >>> all right. thank you, sal. in japan helicopters are still dumping sea water on the earthquake damaged nuclear plant trying to prevent a meltdown. the helicopter crews can only work about 40 minutes at a time for their own safety to limit radiation exposure. now the head of the u.s. nuclear regulatory commission says there's no more water in one of the spent fuel pools at the plant. increasing the chance of widespread nuclear fallout. however, japanese officials deny that that pool is dry. the u.s. government is now chartering airplanes to help evacuate u.s. citizens from japan because of the rising radiation levels. voluntary evacuation to family members of government employees. >>> time now 5:01. scientists here on the west coast are closely watching the movement of the radioactive plume coming from the crippled japanese nuclear reactors. it's expected to hit the illusion islands south of alaska some time today. that plume is then expected to reach southern california late tomorrow. the health experts are emphasizing radiation levels are plunging as th
>>> in japan helicopters are still dumping sea water on an earthquake damaged nuclear plant. the other efforts underway to prevent a meltdown. >>> a big chunk of highway 1 has collapsed and tumbled towards the pacific ocean. what crews are saying about how long it will be closed. >> reporter: the waves at mavericks have taken another life this morning. new details about the frantic efforts to pull the surfer from the water. >>> good morning to you. welcome to thursday. it's march 17th. it's st. patrick's day. i'm dave clark. >> good morning. i'm pam cook. thank you for joining us. let's check in with steve paulson. how does the weather look today? >>> good morning, pamela, dave, clear skies. patch or two of fog, some clouds to the north but over us right now clear and cold. 30s showing up. something we haven't seen for a while. sunshine for a while and then partly cloudy skies. if you're northward there are a few showers starting to move through. we'll talk about that plus a big change in our weather for friday. now sal with an update on traffic. >>> steve, right now on west
in japan isç "out o control." meantime, u.s. forces operating in that country are being moved even further away from the power plant for safety. a live report from tokyo straight ahead. plus police and protesters face off in pakistan just hours after reports that the u.s. paid more than $2 million for the release of a cia contractor accused of murder. new comments on the situation from the secretary of state. >>> and he reached out online to people he never met in person convincing them to kill themselves. now a judge says the minnesota man in this picture must go to jail. >> it's not fair. it's not fair. >>> a push to rally in michigan. protesters still at odds with the state's governor over the budget join forces at the state capital. the latest in the on going standoff between public union workers in this country and some republican lawmakers. >>> i'm tamron hall. "news nation" is following new details on the nuclear crisis in japan. the secretary-general of the international atomic energy association says he's headed to japan as soon as possible as workers at the fukushima plant strugg
by the moment in japan as more radiation is spewing in the atmosphere from the damaged nuclear plant. david piper in the air base west of tokyo. good morning, david. >> martha: the nuclear crisis is a dangerous level now. the fukushima nuclear complex has had a number of a explosion and they are saying it is moving to a dangerous level and the international nuclear agency said that fire started in a storage plant that spent nuclear fuel. japanese officials told them the fire was out now because they reportedly had help from the u.s. military. radiation leveled have sored around the complex. japanese authorities told people to seal doors and winnows and stay in home and avoid going out at all. japanese prime minister said radiation is released from the three reactors from the nuclear plant and a high risk of more radiation coming out. reactors are over heat raising the risk. japan has imposed a no fly zone over the plant. high levels of radiation in tokyo and now reportedly dropping. but just outside of tokyo there are above the normal level by 10 times. back to you in the studio. >> martha:
. >>shepard: i am shephard smith reporting from a frigid night from japan as the nuclear situation appeared earlier to be spinning out-of-control, and we are just getting word that the operator of the the tsunami crippled nuclear plant has almost complete add brand influence power line that could restore electricity to the complex and possibly solve the crisis. this as the head of the international atomic industry confirmed part of a meltdown if reactors one, two, and three of the crippled fukushima power plant calling the situation "very serious." and says he is headed to japan now to deal with the crisis in person. right now, it is difficult to get specifics about what exactly is happening inside the plant. we do know a fuel storage pond at one reactor is believed to be leaking radiation now. and there may be some damage to the containment vessel. crews are desperately trying to keep the fuel rods cool, to prevent them from burning through the concrete containers, and sending mass amounts of radioactive material into the atmosphere. japan's defense minister reports that shoppers had to ab
their involvement, allowing for no troops on the ground. the libyan story, japan story, and the budget situation at home. the continuing resolution that punts the decisions on the budget until the beginning of april. they left town this friday morning. we would like to hear which of these stories are most important to you this friday morning. let's begin with a call from san antonio, texas. robert on the independent line. caller: am i on? good morning. i wanted to say that the most significant story i believe is what is happening in the middle east with all of these uprisings and the people wanting democracy. i find it very significant, even though all of these things are happening across the world like japan, i find this very significant because even though america has not intervened with these countries to try to make than democracies, they themselves have tried to make themselves free of dictators and other powers that they did not have control of. host: robert, what do you think of this particular instance with the united nations out suggesting military force is appropriate in libya? caller:
would not be able to handle a nuclear emergency similar to the events unfoiledding in japan. however, administrator craig fugate told a senate committee yesterday the government as a whole is better prepared to deal with emergencies than it was before hurricane katrina. also testifying, the former inspector general who assessed fema operations since the hurricane. this is about two hours. >> the hearing will come to order. i thank everyone for their patience. as you know we had two votes on the floor. so we delayed the start of the hearing. i welcome, everyone. we convene this hearing which had been long-planned, long-scheduled on fema's ability to respond to a major catastrophe against the compelling backdrop of the tragically catastrophic events unfolding in japan. an earthquake and tsunami in rapid succession that have already resulted in twice as many deaths as al qaeda's attack on america on 9/11. of course no one believes that the death, and finding of the dead is over yet. the earthquake and tsunami have also caused fires and explosions at nuclear power plants that could have
him. so now he is in something -- like crabs coming out of japan, being pulled down by everyone. what is right? what is wrong? president bush was too fast to go into war. they say he is too slow. he is going to take his time to see if he is right and do the right thing by people, not just black people, ever ready. this man loves everybody. you got white people that created this mess and that is coming down on him like he did it. something is wrong with this world. we see things going on and look at it in an abstract way. was notthis war started by president obama. we did not start having money shortage from president obama. he is the first black african american president. you white people sitting around a pole and give your opinion about things. -- around tables and give your opinions about things. you always have done best. this. guehost: our thanks to al- jazeera that is showing us what is going on in libya. from "the new york times", the allies open the air assault on gaddafi forces. residents interviewed. there was heavy fighting and the city center and pro-gaddafi snipers could
-moon on the earthquake and tsunami in japan. he said they will do everything to help japan. we'll have that live on c-span2. in the meantime, anita in "washington journals" he's the ranking member on the subcommittee that covers foreign operations. >> host: thanks for being here. >> guest: my pleasure. >> host: wow, we have a lot going on today. i'm going to start with libya just because the secretary was talking about it. again leaders why europe are meeting, france is pushing for a no-fly zone. what are your thoughts about the u.s. involvement level? how big should it be? and why is that a good investment for this country? >> guest: it's clear to me after discussing it in depth with secretary clinton is the administration is actively involved in strategy sessions and discussions with the international community. the united states cannot act independently. and people may say no-fly zone, they may say -- they may come up with all kinds of actions, but number one, there are implication implications as secretary gates said to every one the proposals. unless we act with the international community, i do
this morning of some of the aftermath of the tsunami in japan. you can see the flooding and fighters. let me show you a couple of other pictures. this is from china. look at the floating vehicles submerged and the flooded streets in the miyagi region of japan. this is what it was like for people in a bookstore in a japanese city as the ceiling started to fall in the aftermath of the earthquake. big, international story affecting millions of people on the pacific rim and lots of news coverage will be coming out as the death tolls become clear and also the damage. we are going to talk national politics today and we want to move to wisconsin. with the union vote in the assembly, the legislation is now sent to the governor for a signature. a reporter for "the wisconsin state journal" is on the phone with us. tell us about what the mood was like inside the chamber as the legislation passed. guest: hostile. there was about an hour or two of debate yesterday. the republicans called off debate and voted as they filed out of the chamber. their democratic colleagues, along with some protesters shouted
countries? if there is any other country i would move to, it would be japan because they are such a great country. i want to say that we do not need to by our friends via financial aid. this is ridiculous. host: we do not need to by our friends. guest: is a matter of developing or alliances, working together in the interest of the united states of america. in haiti, when there is poverty and people do not have homes or a place to live, it is not a matter of buying our friends but to make sure we can bring stability in the country because they are right on our border. the same thing with mexico. people travel everywhere and we are all interconnected. i hope that in addition to suppor >> in about 20 minutes we will take you live to the white house for a news conference with president obama. among the possible topics, libya and the impact of the sue tsunan the west coast. live coverage when it starts, scheduled now for 12:30 eastern, and can we'll have that here on c-span2. a new member of congress, kevin yoder, a freshman representative from kansas who also sits on the gop's appropriations
and tsunami story. the associated press has just announced and msnbc has tweeted that japan is issuing an evacuation order to thousands of residents near a nuclear power plant. certainly, we will keep an eye on this. we will keep an eye on breaking news. this is a big day for people who are following what is going on in the world. jobs. i pulled the baltimore sun because it is typical of what is going on a run the country. home sales rising. we look at your own on and on the rate in kansas and kansas city and the city itself. what is happening with jobs in your district? against coke the job numbers that you are refering to -- guest: the job numbers that you are referring to -- the economy is probably stronger -- keep tax rates low and below regulatory environment in kansas. we try to foster innovation through small businesses. we try to be very welcome to capital and growth. one of the things we are focused on in the kansas city is bioscience. host: arthur government subsidies supporting that? ? there are research dollars the come to our university. as i said, we are making these redu
also non-governmental organizations, look at the regulatory commissions. i think japan is quite a democratic country. it will take awhile to get all the information out of it. in this country, active citizen participation -- go to nuclear regulatory commission hearings. you can comment on all kinds of things. i recently commented on an n.r.c. regulations and rules. it is possible, but i think you have to be vigilant. host: grace writes to us on twitter asking about a ban on nuclear power plants. sharon squassoni, thank you so much for joining us this morning. she is the program director for proliferation prevention at the center for strategic & international studies. let's go now to the floor of the house of representatives, where the session is getting underway. thanks for joining us today. ker. the clerk: the speaker's room, washington, d.c., march 16, 2011. i hereby appoint the honorable renee ellmers to act as speaker pro tempore on this day. signed, john a. boehner, speaker of the house of representatives. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the order of the house of janua
caused by the catastrophe there. it is something that japan with assistance from the world committee can achieve. it is important to recognize that we come into this challenge in the world economy in a much stronger position that we have been. you see much more confidence, i think testified here and around the world, and the resilience in the process of expansion we see under way. we want to sustain that. and they should be our focus and attention. >> i am concerned because we see toshiba and toyota stopping production. illus like we have a systemic shortage of power in japan that will cripple large publicly traded companies in being able to maintain production. >> again, there are a lot of things to be concerned about in the world. it is important that we watch this carefully. very hard to judge at this stage what will be the magnitude of the short-term cost of production output there. our focus will be on trying to help them make sure they can help meet the humanitarian challenge in the reconstruction challenge. i think it can be reasonably confident they will be able to do that. >> se
to make an argument. >> a good point. recently come back from a trip to japan. and we are now here in washington talking as we tape this, but you were there to cover another extraordinary story overseas and you have done a lot of that. what i am trying to understand is, in a way, why did you make that trip? if you answer me, because it was a great story, it is not enough. why do you make the trip? you have seven responsibilities they cut into a decision, because it costs a lot to send you and a lot of people overseas. why did you make the trip to japan? >> i wish i could say it was a science. it's not. a lot of this is i feel impelled to go. it is not just that i covered the tsunami in indonesia and southeast asia, but i felt that that was a story that i had to experience tangibly and to see. and as we said, this incredible constellation of disasters. and i felt at the time, at that moment, too, that there was a reason for the entire broadcast to be there. part of being an anchor is a decision about where are you best there anchoring. isn't it don hewitt and coined the term anchor
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16